Shared mobility – Top 20 reports and papers you must read

Globally, shared mobility is on an upward trend, exhibiting significant growth in all major regions over the past several years. This innovative transportation strategy enables users to have short-term access to transportation mode on an as-needed basis. It is a promising way to reduce traffic congestion and CO2 emissions.

In 2017, around 10 million people were using shared mobility, and, according to a study by Frost & Sullivan, by 2025, their numbers will reach 36 million, maintaining the annual growth rate of 16.4%. Global Market Insights forecasts the value of the global car sharing market in 2024 at USD 11 billion. The car-sharing market exceeded USD 2.5 billion in 2019.

Shared mobility broadly means any mode of transportation, from bikes to 4-wheelers to mass transit, being shared by users. It includes the movement of both people and goods, including roundtrip services, one-way station-based services, and one-way free-floating services.

Since many social, environmental, and behavioral impacts can be attributed to shared mobility, there is growing attention for shared mobility studies recently among researcher communities investigating several challenges and issues at strategic, tactical, and operational management levels.

This post presents some of the key reports and researches conducted by researchers in recent years on shared mobility in urban and smart cities, which are struggling alongside increased population growth and density.

Partnerships Between Transit Agencies and Transportation Network Companies

This report draws on a thorough investigation of active and inactive partnerships between transit agencies and TNCs. The report presents findings on both transit agencies and TNCs’ data and information requirements, the various benefits and outcomes that transit agencies, communities, and customers have pursued through partnerships, and the challenges that transit agencies face in developing partnerships with TNCs.

Read the full report here.

MaaS Movement? Issues and Options on Mobility as a Service for City Region Transport Authorities

This report examines the concept of mobility as a service (MaaS) — identifying the three key factors determining its future. The report also sets out the city regions’ issues and options about the role they could play in shaping MaaS in their areas.

Read the full report here.

Emissions Benefits of Electric Vehicles in Uber and Lyft Services

This research examines EV use in TNC fleets from 2016 through 2018. Quantifies the emissions benefits of EV use within TNC fleets, assesses the capability of EVs to perform TNC services and analyzes the effects of EV use within TNC fleets on the charging behavior of non-TNC EVs. Concludes that the emission benefits of electrifying a vehicle in a TNC fleet are nearly three times greater than the benefits for electrifying a privately-owned vehicle.

Read the full report here.

Estimated TNC Share of VMT in Six US Metropolitan Regions

This report estimates the combined Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT) of transportation network companies (TNCs) ride-hailing services in six metropolitan regions. It compares that value to approximate total VMT in each area for the same period. According to the study, in the six major regions studied, TNCs are estimated to account for between one percent and three percent of total regional VMT. However, TNC shares in these regions’ core and central areas are higher, ranging from about 2 percent of total VMT to over 13 percent of total VMT.

Read the full report here.

Integrating Shared Mobility into Multimodal Transportation Planning

This report describes case studies of how metropolitan planning organizations are integrating shared mobility into regional multimodal transportation planning. This report also identifies how transportation agencies are working with shared mobility companies to integrate these options into regional multimodal transportation networks to improve system performance and support regional goals.

Read the full report here.

Assessing the Experience of Providers and Users of Transportation Network Company Ridesharing Services

This report studies driver and traveler attitudes towards UberPool and Lyft Shared, Uber, and Lyft’s services that utilize data connectivity and analytics to match travelers on the fly so they can share rides.

Read the full report here.

Mobility on Demand: A Smart, Sustainable, and Equitable Future

A synopsis of a January 13, 2019 workshop that explored the current state of mobility on demand (MOD), examined the next steps for preparing for the transition to autonomy and discussed ways to optimize sustainability and ensure equitability. The workshop emphasized public transit, shared mobility, and automation, shaping the future of mobility.

Read the full report here.

Micro mobility in Cities: A History and Policy Overview

This report explores the rapidly changing and disruptive nature of micro-mobility. It provides city officials with useful information to deploy micro-mobility options safely, in a profitable, and equitable way. It begins by defining micro-mobility and exploring the recent history of docked and dockless bikes and e-scooters. Then explores the challenges and opportunities facing cities, and illustrates a few examples of cities that are addressing these issues head-on. Concludes with a set of recommendations cities can consider as they work to regulate these new mobility technologies.

Read the full report here.

Partners in Transit – A Review of Partnerships Between Transportation Network Companies and Public Agencies in the United States

This report summarizes the status of twenty-nine partnerships between TNCs and public bodies around the United States aimed at improving mobility, of which twenty-two are active at present. The research team evaluated for each of the partnerships observed: when the programs were active, whether they had been modified since their inception, how the programs were financially structured, and how program performance audits were made publicly available.

Read the full report here.

The New Automobility: Lyft, Uber and the Future of American Cities

This report combines recently published research and newly available data from a national travel survey and other sources to create a detailed TNC ridership profile, users, and usage. It discusses how TNC and micro-transit services can benefit urban transportation, how policymakers can respond to traffic and transit impacts, and the implications of the current experience for planning and implementing shared autonomous vehicles in major American cities.

Read the full report here.

Broadening Understanding of the Interplay Between Public Transit, Shared Mobility, and Personal Automobiles

This report explores the effects on the city where they operate of app-based transport network companies, including public transit ridership, single-occupancy vehicle trips, and traffic congestion. Building on the findings of TCRP Research Report 188, this report explores how shared modes — and, in particular, ride-sourcing companies — interact with the use of public transit and personal cars.

Read the full report here.

The Shared-Use City: Managing the Curb

This report discusses how to manage growing competition to curb access in cities. It explores the potential for a shift away from curb use focused on street parking to the more flexible allocation that includes pick-up and drop-off zones for passengers and freight.

Read the full report here.

Why TNCs Will Be Regulated Like Taxis–Historically Speaking

This report forecasts how transportation network companies (TNCs) will be regulated soon. The authors hypothesize that when TNCs are regulated like taxis, customers will experience a high level of service at reasonable rates.

Read the full report here.

Legal Considerations in Relationships Between Transit Agencies and Ride Sourcing Service Providers

The report explores the public transit agencies’ efforts to provide public on-demand services. It also gives legal guidance to transit agencies to consider whether to enter into relationships with providers of ride-sourcing services (RSPs). The report includes a description of U.S. ride-sourcing services, state and municipal legislative and regulatory schemes, procurement and procurement processes, contractual and partnership provisions in agreements between RSPs and a public transit agency, issues of compliance with federal and civil rights requirements and those under the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Read the full report here.

The Effects of Ride-Hailing Services on Travel and Associated Greenhouse Gas Emissions

This white paper analyzes ride-hailing services’ effects on elements of the transportation system, including congestion, vehicle miles traveled, and greenhouse gas emissions. This report also determines the effects of ride-hailing on individual vehicle ownership choices, the use of ride-hailing services by those who otherwise would not be traveling independently by car, choice of destination, choice of mode, operation of ride-hailing vehicles without a traveler, and land use.

Read the full report here.

Peer-to-Peer (P2P) car sharing: Understanding Early Markets, Social Dynamics, and Behavioral Impacts

This report studies the effect of peer-to-peer car-sharing on behavior and its operational challenges, opportunities, and market characteristics.

Read the full report here.

Broadening Understanding of the Interplay Between Public Transit, Shared Mobility, and Personal Automobiles

The study expands understanding of the interplay between emerging and established modes of transport. Building on the findings of TCRP Research Report 188, this report explores how shared modes — and, in particular, ride-sourcing companies — interact with the use of public transit and personal cars.

Read the full report here.

Disruptive Transportation: The Adoption, Utilization, and Impacts of Ride-Hailing in the United States

This report presents findings from the comprehensive travel and residential survey deployed in seven major U.S. cities, with a targeted, representative sample of their urban and suburban populations in two phases from 2014 to 2016. The purpose is to provide early insight into the impacts of ride-hailing on adoption, use, and travel behavior. The report is structured around three main themes: ride-hailing adoption, vehicle ownership, and driving, ride-hailing, and use of public transit.

Read the full report here.

Mobility on Demand Operational Concept Report

This report provides an overview of the concept of Mobility on Demand (MOD) and its evolution, a description of the MOD ecosystem within a framework of supply and demand, and its stakeholders and enablers. Taking advantage of the MOD ecosystem framework, this report reviews the key enablers for the system, including business models and partnerships, land use and various urbanization scenarios, social equity, and environmental justice, policies and standards, and enabling technology. This review focuses mostly on the newer forms of MOD (e.g., shared mobility).

Read the full report here.

Shared Automated Vehicles: Review of Business Models

This report provides an introduction to the current state of vehicle automation and shared mobility. The paper discusses current shared mobility business models to foster a better understanding of these systems and set the stage for possible future shared automated vehicle (SAV) business models. The discussion covers current SAV pilot projects worldwide and then explores potential SAV business and service models considering high or full automation (Level 4 and higher).

Read the full report here.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here